Nyobolt’s electric sports car shows 5-minute fast-charging in action


If there were reliable high-power EV fast-chargers everywhere, and you could gain about 100 miles of range in four minutes, would you really need such a big battery?

The very fast-charging battery cells from Cambridge, U.K.-based Nyobolt aren’t the solid-state cells that are so eagerly anticipated as a potential EV game-changer, but they lead to some of the same questions. Without as much concern over charge rates, automakers could potentially ease the bloat from ever-larger battery packs—leading to lighter, greener EVs. 

Nyobolt electric sports car prototype

Nyobolt electric sports car prototype

Nyobolt says that its 35-kwh battery pack is compact enough to allow a very light 2,750-pound sports car within 100 pounds of the original Lotus-based Tesla Roadster. It has installed the pack into a prototype from Callum, the EV-focused startup created by former Jaguar design boss Ian Callum. 

While the electric sports car concept was previewed last year, it’s now a drivable vehicle. The firm says that this prototype “will advance testing of the technology in the real world, enabling OEMs to experience Nyobolt’s ultra-fast charging technology first hand.”

Nyobolt electric sports car prototype

Nyobolt electric sports car prototype

Nyobolt electric sports car prototype

Nyobolt electric sports car prototype

Nyobolt electric sports car prototype

Nyobolt electric sports car prototype

Mathematically, its 10-80% charge in under five minutes means that the Nyobolt pack is charging up near 350 kw for a significant portion of that time. Nyobolt says that the first four minutes of the pack’s charging session—on a CCS connector—is maxed out at a constant current of 500 amps, adding 120 miles of WLTP range (likely nearly 100 EPA-equivalent miles) in that time. 

Nyobolt points to its niobium oxide anode materials as a key to how its low-impedance lithium-ion cells circumvent concerns about cell degradation that normally accompany such charge rates. It says that these 24.5-Ah cells have completed the depth-of-discharge fast-charge cycles equating to more than 600,000 miles. 

Nyobolt electric sports car prototype

Nyobolt electric sports car prototype

Specifically in this application, Nyobolt’s battery cooling circuit incorporates a chiller and AC compressor/condenser so as to keep the battery temperature no higher than 60 degrees C (140 degrees F).

Nyobolt says that it could be in low-volume production with its cells within a year, allowing 1,000 packs in 2025, and it’s in talks with eight different automakers regarding the use of its tech in high-performance EVs. As for whether that will yield EVs that truly go light, now more than ever it’s a matter of charging.



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